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Quality

Quality Management

For our customers and for DQS, quality is the key to sustainable business success. 

Environmental Responsibility

Environmental Responibility

Only systematic environmental protection can create a balance.

Automotive 

Automotive  

Manufacturers, OEM suppliers, IATF, VDA – if this is your industry, we have the certification services you need.

Food & Hygiene

food feed hygiene

Food and Hygiene safety systems provide a first-line defense for consumer safety.

Workplace Safety

Workplace Safety

Taking good care of your employees is one of the essential goals. 

IT and Service Management

IT and Service Management

 Find out what DQS has to offer for your business.

Social Responsibility

Social Responsibility

Securing basic human rights benefits your business, if you know which standards to apply. 

Medical Devices

Medical Devices

DQS offers a variety of services in the field of medical devices approval. 

Animal Feed

Animal Feed

Because safety and quality of animal feed is the first stage for consumer safety.

Aerospace

Aerospace

If your value stream needs wings to fly, a certification to the 9100 series by DQS will get it in the air. 

Risk Management

Risk Management

Risk is the effect of uncertainty on the achievement of objectives. 

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ASSOCIATE PROFESSIONAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM AUDITORS

We are looking for associate professional management system auditors to join our team.

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INHOUSE TRAINING PT. WILO PUMPS INDONESIA

ISO 9001:2015 (Awareness & Internal Audit)

23 Juli & 05 Agustus 2019

Berawal dari keinginan dan ambisi PT. Wilo Pumps Indonesia untuk ingin mendapatkan pengetahuan tentang ISO 9001:2015 dimana terdiri dari pengetahuan Awareness yang berupa pengetahuan dasar dari standar tersebut dan juga melihat perbedaan antara klausul ISO 9001 versi lama dengan versi yang terbaru. Sehingga bisa melihat kesesuaian yang akan di terapkan didalam perusahaan.

Selain itu DQS Indonesia juga memberikan training Internal Audit dimana akan memberikan gambaran khusus bagaimana teknis pelaksanaan internal audit. Dan juga poin-poin penting apa saja yang menjadi penilaian internal audit. DQS juga memberikan kesempatan kepada peserta training untuk membuat studi kasus sendiri atau simulasi pelaksaan audit versi yang mereka rasakan.

Dan juga ada hal yang paling berkesan dari training ini adalah pelaksanaan training dalam kondisi mati listrik karena masalah yang terjadi pada PLN lalu sejak 04 Augustus 2019, sebelum pelaksanaan di hari kedua di tanggal 05 Agustus 2019 . Peserta walau dengan penerangan seadanya dan udara yang cukup hangat, tetap semangat menjalani training ini sampai selesai .

Shaping DQS for the future

…was the main theme under which DQS managing directors from 60 countries gathered in Frankfurt for their annual International Management Meeting 2019.

During this year’s meeting, the participants analyzed the current situation of DQS Group and its various international offices, easily summarized by stating that 2018 was one of the most succesful years so far, resulting in 125 000 audit days and 65 000 certificates in more than 130 countries, and that 2019 is off to an excellent start already. Among the core subjects of the meeting, digitalization was one of the key words: How will management certification adopt to new methods and techniques, what instruments and tools will DQS provide for its auditing services? The participants discussed about business segments such as Cyber & Information Security, Sustainability, Food Safety audits, Compliance or Training issues. Compliance to accreditation standards and their impact on auditing were another major subject. Besides working intensively on these subjects, the participants exchanged with their colleagues their own experiences in their local markets.

During the meeting, DQS also presented their revised corporate brochure, which you can find here.

We hope that everyone interested in the work of DQS and management certification will find it interesting to read.

Source: DQS Holding website (https://www.dqs-holding.com/en/media/news/shaping-dqs-for-the-future/).

For more information, please send email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

GFSI UPDATES ITS BENCHMARKING CRITERIA: WHAT CAN WE EXPECT?

“Safe food for consumers everywhere”. The vision of the Global Food Safety Initiative’s (GFSI) can only be put into practice if the requirements for food safety reflect the latest developments and learnings from the industry. In April 2019, GFSI released an update version of their bechmarking criteria for public consultation. What’s about to change and what do these changes mean for customers that are certified to IFS, BRCGS and FSSC 22000?

The Global Food Safety Initiative was created in the year 2000 to find collaborative solutions to collective concerns, notably to reduce food safety risks, audit duplication and costs while building trust throughout the supply chain. For this reason GFSI introduced their so called benchmarking requirements, which define expectations that certification schemes must correspond with in order to be recognized by GFSI. Schemes like IFS, BRCGS and FSSC 22000 have adopted these requirements in order to achieve GFSI recognition.

When GFSI prepares a new version of its requirements, certification schemes adopt the changes in order to maintain this recognition. Therefore, the GFSI requirements are a good indicator of the type of changes we can expect in food safety schemes in the coming years. Let’s take a look at that future together.

What is about the change in the new GFSI version?

The revision incorporates new elements that have taken center stage in the food safety conversation. One of these elements is food safety culture. This term describes shared values, beliefs and norms that affect the mindset and behaviour toward food safety in, across and throughout an organization. Elements of food safety culture are those elements of the Food Safety Management System which the senior management of a company may use to drive the food safety culture within the company. These may include, but are not limited to communication about food safety policies and responsibilities, training, employee feedback on food safety related issues and performance measurement. Last year GFSI already published a position paper regarding this topic. You can find the summary here.

Furthermore, the new version introduced the compulsory testing of the traceability system. Another change is related to the product development. Product design and development procedure shall be established, implemented and maintained for new products or changes to product or manufacturing processes to ensure safe and legal products are produced.

Please keep in mind: further modifications of the requirements as a result of the public consultation are possible.

Timetable

The public consultation for part three of the document will end on May 24. You can download the documents here. The public consultation for part one, two and four will open in September. Version 8 will be published in February 2020 in time for GFSI’s 20th birthday. Generally, the standard issuers adapt the changes in the following years.

Source: DQS CFS website (https://dqs-cfs.com/2019/05/gfsi-updates-its-benchmarking-criteria-what-can-we-expect/).

For more information, please send email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

IS CHINA A SUPPLY CHAIN RISK? LEARNINGS FROM THE JIANGSU EXPLOSION

On March 21, a devastating explosion occurred in a chemical plant in Xiangshui, Jiangsu, China. 78 people lost their lives, over 617 persons were injured. Sadly, the explosion is not an isolated occurrence, but one in a long series of deadly accidents. If your company has high-risk suppliers in China, we encourage you to make sure your due diligence processes are watertight.

The blast in Jiangsu is the latest in a long series of deadly explosions in chemical plants. A blast in Tianjin in 2015 killed 173 people (source), another one in Dongying, China killed 13 in the same year (source), and 23 people left their lives in Hebei Province in 2017 (source). Not only the chemical sector is affected though: an explosion in a factory that manufactures automotive parts killed 146 workers and injured 114 others (source) in Kunshan, Jiangsu, in 2014.

The ones most affected in catastrophes like these are without any doubt the workers: many of them lose their lives, and many more lose their jobs. On a quite different level, however, there can be a significant impact on the customers:

  • Supply chain disruption can lead to scarcity of (raw) materials
    • The failure to ensure safe working conditions at the supplier reflects negatively upon the sustainability performance of the buyer
    • As shown in the case of Pakistani workers against the German textile discount store KiK, buyers can face lawsuits if they fail to ensure safe working conditions in the supply chain
    • Accidents and incidents in the supply chain reflect negatively upon the reputation and image of the buyer

All of these aspects point to one conclusion: a risk in your supply chain is a risk to you.

Managing Supply Chain Risks: Due Diligence on Workplace Safety & Human Rights

If the safety of workers is at risk in your supply chain, you are expected to manage that risk – even if you have no immediate control over it. Due diligence is the risk management process to identify, prevent and mitigate negative impacts on the rights of workers in your operations and supply chain.

Let’s link that back to the Jiangsu explosion and how to avoid such accidents in your supply chain:

  1. Determine the level of risk: The risk assessment usually considers factors like location, nature of the operations, track record of the region/country, availability of audit results, certificates, results of self-assessments and surveys, etc. In the case of the Jiangsu explosion, the fact that they work with hazardous and highly explosive chemicals, combined with the poor track record of the region, should have been sufficient to classify the supplier as high risk.
  2. Identify specific risks: once a supplier has been categorized as high-risk, it is necessary to get a better understanding of the situation on the ground. This can be achieved through site visits, workplace inspections and social audits.
  3. Taking measures to mitigate the risk: If step 2 confirms that the supplier presents risks that you are unwilling to support, you need to take measures to reduce that risk to acceptable proportions. This typically involves a combination of working with the supplier to improve workplace safety, closing gaps and nonconformities, and audits to track and verify progress. However, it can also entail ending the relationship with the supplier.

Could the Jiangsu disaster have been avoided this way? We will never know for sure. What is certain, however, is that companies will increasingly be held accountable for the working conditions in their supply chain. While nobody expects companies to be able to exclude accidents entirely, there is the expectation to make every reasonable effort. That is exactly what due diligence is.

How DQS can help

DQS has highly qualified personnel across the globe, and China is no exception. With 12 offices in mainland China, we have local auditors and assessors who are familiar with the local and regional situation. All services are brought to you under the technical supervision of DQS Group.

We can support your responsible sourcing and due diligence processes with:

Source: DQS CFS website (https://dqs-cfs.com/2019/05/is-china-a-supply-chain-risk-learnings-from-the-jiangsu-explosion/).

For more information, please send email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

HUMAN RIGHTS DUE DILIGENCE: WHY REGULATION IS NOT A BAD IDEA

Will human rights due diligence become a mandatory legal requirement in Germany? Statements from various government representatives have indicated that additional regulation may be on its way. Heated reactions from the private sector have been quick to follow. Ingo Kramer, President of the German Employers’ Association, went as far as to say that he hopes the government “abandons this nonsense”. But would it really hurt business if the German government made human rights due diligence mandatory?

Judging by the tone of the debate, the suggestion that human rights due diligence may become mandatory seems to have hit a nerve. For some, making due diligence mandatory is a necessary step to improve the human rights situation in global supply chains. For others, it is yet another bureaucratic measure without any real impact, while putting German companies at a competitive disadvantage. Before we jump into the controversy (and become a part of it), let’s consider the facts.

Human Rights Due Diligence: Is a new law on its way?

  • What is being planned?
    On February 10, 2019 the German daily newspaper TAZ reported that the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development is working on a law that would make human rights due diligence mandatory for German companies. The law would require companies to identify human rights risks in their supply chain and to take measures to reduce those risks.
  • Why would we need such legislative changes? 
    Germany already has a National Action Plan on Business and Human Rights (NAP), which it adopted in 2016. The plan lays down the responsibility of businesses in preventing human rights violations and provides guidance on the measures companies should take. The NAP focuses not only on the companies as such, but includes their suppliers and contractors, nationally and internationally. However, the NAP did not introduce sanctions for companies that do not assume their responsibility – it is an action plan rather than an enforceable law. Because voluntary approaches have their limits, the new law is being considered.
  • Who would be affected?
    Human rights due diligence would become mandatory for companies with over 250 employees and over 40 million Euros annual turnover. Affected companies have to take measures to ensure human rights compliance in their operations and supply chain, independently of whether suppliers are based in Germany or abroad.
  • When could human rights due diligence become mandatory? 
    Whether the proposed law will ever be voted is highly uncertain. At the moment, the government is monitoring to what extent German companies already comply with the expectations of the National Action Plan. This monitoring is to be completed by 2020. The Minister of Labour Hubertus Heil has stated that when the monitoring would show that less than 50 % of the affected companies meet the expectations, the intention is to make human rights due diligence mandatory by law. However, such a law would obviously have to be voted by the relevant institutions. On top of that, the monitoring itself has also become the subject of controversy, making it impossible to rule out any scenario. The only certainty seems that the importance of human rights due diligence will continue to grow in the foreseeable future.

The Arguments against the Plan – and why they do not hold

In an interview with Rheinische Post, the president of the German Employers Association Ingo Krämer called the bill “absurd”. This statement led to media headlines such as “Economy Against Human Rights Law” (Tagesschau) and “Private Sectors opposes Commitment to Human Rights” (Spiegel). In reality, the reactions from the private sector have been much more diverse. Leading companies such as Kik, Tchibo and Daimler welcome the initiative, because they feel a binding regulation would provide much-needed legal certainty. So what is all the fuzz about?

Counterargument # 1: “Competitive disadvantage for Germany in a globalized world”

One of the parties to fiercely oppose the plan for new legislation is the liberal FDP. Christoph Hoffmann, member of the German parliament, argued such a law could not work. “Trade takes place globally; the focus markets are no longer in Germany or Europe.” It would therefore be wrong to create special obligations only for German companies.

But would Germany really be the exception? Not quite – both Australia and the UK have already passed a Modern Slavery Act, France has the Duty of Vigilance Law since 2017, in Switzerland the Reponsible Business Initiative led to a counter-proposal by Parliament and similar measures are being discussed in Finland and Norway.

In addition, Hoffmann assumes that a legal regulation would discriminate against German companies internationally – an assumption that is at least questionable. A law that makes human rights due diligence would not only specify what is required of a company, but also make clear what cannot be reasonably expected of them. This ensures proportionality and legal certainty. Moreover, due diligence can increase investor confidence and protect the image of German brands internationally. Thus, the legal regulation would not weaken the German economy, but sustainably strengthen it.

Counterargument #2: “Legislation puts the brakes on voluntary initiatives”

In recent years, a variety of industry initiatives has sprung up, all aiming to ensure compliance with human rights in the supply chain. Would a new law thwart these voluntary efforts? The association Textil + Mode, for example, has already stated that such a law would “undermine the industry’s efforts in the textile alliance” (source).

If legislation were suddenly to formulate entirely new expectations, that would indeed create problems for industry initiatives that are already operational. However, there are no indications that the proposed law would radically change course. Almost all industry initiatives are based upon the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, which are also at the heart of the National Action Plan for Business and Human Rights. Thus, the proposed legislation would be aligned with existing initiatives and may even contribute to their success.

Counterargument #3: “We have no influence over human rights in our supply chain“

“When I, as an entrepreneur, have personal influence over the production in my factory abroad, of course, I feel obligated to work according to our social and ecological standards,” said employer president Kramer. “But not when I cannot influence that, or as a medium-sized company, cannot even monitor it.” Similarly, the association Textil + Mode claims that it is not possible to control human rights in the supply chains abroad.

In our view, this argument is invalid for several reasons.

First, let’s replace the word “human rights” with “quality”. Who in their right mind would claim that quality cannot be monitored or influenced in the supply chain? Right – no one. Just as there are good practices and tools to ensure that suppliers comply with quality standards, similar methods can be used to ensure that suppliers comply with social and ethical requirements.

Of course, there are industry-specific factors that hamper monitoring, such as very long and complex supply chains, which present particular challenges to the textile industry. But even there, there are promising initiatives to increase transparency, benefiting not only the workers, but also the industry itself.

Second, an often-heard objection is that the purchasing power of small and medium-sized enterprises is too limited to influence suppliers. However, this is precisely what makes it necessary to have a regulating framework: If all German companies have the same expectations towards their suppliers, this generates the much-needed critical mass to exert influence.

Outlook: Assuming Responsibility for Human Rights in the Supply Chain

With or without legal obligation: Companies would be well advised to introduce procedures for human rights due diligence. Customers, investors, policymakers, workers and civil society expect companies to take responsibility for upholding human rights in their supply chain. Like any other risk, the risk of human rights violations is one that needs to be managed. If the government will not impose sanctions, customers will.

How DQS can support your Human Rights Due Diligence:

– Gap analysis and benchmarking of your due diligence procedures
– UN Human Rights Assessment
– Global Conformance Mark Certification
– Supplier audits across the globe
– Training and capability building
– Verification of sustainability reporting.

Source: DQS CFS website (https://dqs-cfs.com/2019/04/human-rights-due-diligence-why-regulation-is-not-a-bad-idea/).

For more information, please send email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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DQS Certification NEWS

INHOUSE TRAINING PT. WILO PUMPS INDONESIA ISO 9001:2015 (Awareness & Internal Audit)

INHOUSE TRAINING PT. WILO PUMPS INDONESIA ISO 9001:2015 (Awareness & Internal Audit) 23 Juli & 05 Agustus 2019 Berawal dari keinginan dan ambisi PT. Wilo Pumps Indonesia untuk ingin mendapatkan pengetahuan tentang ISO 9001:2015 dimana terdiri dari pengetahuan Awareness yang berupa pengetahuan dasar dari standar tersebut dan juga melihat perbedaan antara klausul ISO 9001 versi lama dengan versi yang terbaru. Sehingga bisa melihat kesesuaian yang akan di terapkan didalam perusahaan.

06-08-2019
- by dqsindonesia
Read more »
Shaping DQS for the future

Shaping DQS for the future …was the main theme under which DQS managing directors from 60 countries gathered in Frankfurt for their annual International Management Meeting 2019. During this year’s meeting, the participants analyzed the current situation of DQS Group and its various international offices, easily summarized by stating that 2018 was one of the most succesful years so far, resulting in 125 000 audit days and 65 000 certificates in more than 130 countries, and that 2019 is off to

29-07-2019
- by dqsindonesia
Read more »
GFSI UPDATES ITS BENCHMARKING CRITERIA: WHAT CAN WE EXPECT?

GFSI UPDATES ITS BENCHMARKING CRITERIA: WHAT CAN WE EXPECT? “Safe food for consumers everywhere”. The vision of the Global Food Safety Initiative’s (GFSI) can only be put into practice if the requirements for food safety reflect the latest developments and learnings from the industry. In April 2019, GFSI released an update version of their bechmarking criteria for public consultation. What’s about to change and what do these changes mean for customers that are certified to IFS, BRCGS and FSSC

29-07-2019
- by dqsindonesia
Read more »
IS CHINA A SUPPLY CHAIN RISK? LEARNINGS FROM THE JIANGSU EXPLOSION

IS CHINA A SUPPLY CHAIN RISK? LEARNINGS FROM THE JIANGSU EXPLOSION On March 21, a devastating explosion occurred in a chemical plant in Xiangshui, Jiangsu, China. 78 people lost their lives, over 617 persons were injured. Sadly, the explosion is not an isolated occurrence, but one in a long series of deadly accidents. If your company has high-risk suppliers in China, we encourage you to make sure your due diligence processes are watertight. The blast in Jiangsu is the latest in a long series

29-07-2019
- by dqsindonesia
Read more »
HUMAN RIGHTS DUE DILIGENCE: WHY REGULATION IS NOT A BAD IDEA

HUMAN RIGHTS DUE DILIGENCE: WHY REGULATION IS NOT A BAD IDEA Will human rights due diligence become a mandatory legal requirement in Germany? Statements from various government representatives have indicated that additional regulation may be on its way. Heated reactions from the private sector have been quick to follow. Ingo Kramer, President of the German Employers’ Association, went as far as to say that he hopes the government “abandons this nonsense”. But would it really hurt business if

29-07-2019
- by dqsindonesia
Read more »

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